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Author Topic: Linux  (Read 5492 times)
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ccfilms



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« on: February 10, 2005, 08:02:03 PM »

I recently downloaded MandrakeLinux 10.1 (the friendly distro...hehe). I like it ALOT! I think I got like 30 different penguin wallpapers loaded onto this thing.

Anyways, I love the UNIX architecture and considering that it's a free O/s, it's cool!

Also, never fear, I got it loaded on a different hard drive. When I wanna go back to windowsXP, I just reach down next to me and pull the plug on my linux drive (literally) then plug back in my windows drive. Cheesy Works like a charm and is so very easy. (I make sure my computer is turned off first).

Anyways, anyone else used Linux? It's a pretty cool alternative to Windows or Mac....and you don't have to be a windows or mac guy to love it, cuz it appeals to both parts (sorta).

Anyways, it actually is faster for BLENDER rendering by 20% (I ran a test with a scene file provided by Ian).

Here's a picture of my Linux desktop (I think I got BabyTux's face as my wallpaper on there now, but that WAS my desktop two days ago).



And here's a few more pics, if your interested: Image 1, Image 2,  Image 3


And no, it's not a Mac copy-off. Even though they are both based on UNIX architecture, Linux has pretty well established a name for itself since 1991.

Here's where I got my distro: http://www.mandrakelinux.com

 :unsure:  *IM NOT A NERD*
« Last Edit: February 10, 2005, 08:02:40 PM by ccfilms » Logged

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durbnpoisn

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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2005, 09:15:42 AM »

Yeah, dude, I'm right there with you.

I run the exact same distrobution.  I run it as a duel boot on one of my machines.  I can also boot it up in Win2k.  But, I set mine up as a dule boot with seperate partitions instead of mucking with seperate drives.

I also run Mandrake 9.4 on another machine.  I use that machine as a web/FTP server.  It's very stable, riliable and secure!


I've been using Mandrake since version 7.0.  It's come a lon way.  It's damn close to competing with Windows directly.  Damn close.  I'm writing this on my Mandrake 10.1 box.  I love it!  I use it all the time.  Aside from not being able to run After Effects, it can do anything else that my Windows machines can do.


Let me make one suggestion that you may like...  Go to WINE HQ, and download the newest version.  It is a Windows emulator that allows you to seamlessly run lots of different ACTUAL Windows apps right in Linux.  It's seamless.  The program doesn't know or care that it's running under Linux.  WINE is open source and it's free!!


Lemme know if you have any other questions about it.  Like I said, I've been using it for a while.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2005, 09:16:30 AM by durbnpoisn » Logged

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Funk, E

« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2005, 09:20:20 AM »

I sometimes run Dyne:Bolic on my Xbox.
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Mrdodobird

« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2005, 07:35:05 PM »

Linux is the evil which haunts me in my sleep.  
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durbnpoisn

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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2005, 05:51:48 AM »

Quote
Anyways, it actually is faster for BLENDER rendering by 20% (I ran a test with a scene file provided by Ian).


Ian - can you send me that file too?  I'd really like to take a look at it.  I've been meaning to get more into Blender.  A fully set up scene file would be something nice to have a look at.
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Funk, E

« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2005, 06:38:48 PM »

Hey, now there's a version of Apache for Xbox, too.  

Neaaat.
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Mrdodobird

« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2005, 07:12:38 PM »

Sure, Durb. How do you want me to send it to ya? Email?  
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Jamball



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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2005, 09:16:19 PM »

Does LINUX support 64-bit processors?


--Jamball

 
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djr33

« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2005, 09:51:58 PM »

no clue.... but open source, probably someone will write it soon if not already done...
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durbnpoisn

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« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2005, 11:48:24 AM »

Quote
Does LINUX support 64-bit processors?


--Jamball
Yes.  It does.  My buddy just set one up, in fact.

I know Red Hat, Mandrake, and SUSE all have 64 bit versions.

Oddly enough, SUSE is what I'm writing in about today...

I'm been a big supporter of Mandrake for a few years now.  But, I installed in on my laptop and actaully had a bit of trouble with it.  Some of the hardware was just not supported.  And I couldn't manually set it up.

So, I went and got a copy of SUSE 9.2 and installed that.

Works like a charm.  In fact, I'd say that it's got Mandrake beat in many areas.  It even uses the same (and newer version) desktop - KDE 3.3


I'm very impressed!!  And, happy...  Because now I can use my laptop again!
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Sage

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« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2005, 02:30:17 PM »

Sweet.

Sage H.
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durbnpoisn

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« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2005, 05:36:55 PM »

Okay, so as it turns out, the SUSE distro is awesome, as I said before...  But, KDE (the desktop GUI), it really bloated.  Entirely too much for my 256mz 64RAM laptop.  It runs at a crawl.

So, I need to get more RAM.  In the meantime, I can boot up the laptop using a CD of DSL Linux.  It's a tremendously compact, fully functional OS based on the Debian distribution (it's about 50mb total).

Anyway...  It's a totally different method of doing things...  But, right out of the box, it's a completely functional system for all simple tasks like, email, web browsing, FTP, text (code) editing, etc.  So, for a simple laptop, that system is perfectly fine.  Especially since it works about 300% faster than Win98 which is what the laptop was designed for.

I had spoken about this version of Linux before.    Here is the link for it, if you want to check it out.
You can actually download a version and run it in a window in Windows.  It doesn't even know that it's running in a little window.  Wild.
 
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durbnpoisn

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« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2005, 03:49:20 PM »

I'm so old that my first computers WERE command line interface.  So, for me, working with Linux is like going back to the old days.

The only real difference is that it seems that there are a practically infinite number of commands that you can run, and they are mostly dependant on what terminal you happen to be using.  You need an interpreter after all.  It seems that most distributions have their own idea what's best.

On top of that, I tend to write some of my own scripts (the equivelent of a batch file in DOS), where I can automate a bunch of tasks by typing a single command.

So, it's all really cool by me.
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JustinZ

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« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2005, 03:58:37 PM »

Indeed.  Processing a lot of files at once is where command-line interfaces really shine.  In Windows, if you want to rename a bunch of files to add "-old" on the end of their names, you're in for a ton of tedious, error-prone work.  In Unix, it's a trivial command, and the system does it for you.

Justin
 
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durbnpoisn

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« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2005, 05:46:40 PM »

Right.  To elaborate on that...

In DOS, you had a set of commands.  A large but still limitted set.

Linux (or UNIX) has been around for so long, that just about any process that can be easier automated, someone has written a function for, and it's been migrated from version to version.  That's my understanding anyway.

If you look at the list of commands, and options for those commands, in Bash (the common Terminal interpreter), the sheer number of them is astonishing.
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