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Author Topic: Makin' my movie  (Read 10780 times)
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Tru_Slice



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« on: December 20, 2005, 02:59:32 PM »

:bangHead!:

I haven't been here in a long while, but I need your guys' help.

I'm about to make a SW fanfilm (if it's that successful).

I have props and costumes, but I'm mainly worried about the production.




-I am going to do a couple of greenscreen scenes, but I have no idea how to.

-I am going to rotoscope, but I have little experience.

-I have a camera, but have little experience using it.



If any of you guys have ever made any type of greenscreen, rotoscoping, or even made a movie, please tell me how to make a good movie.

 
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Funk, E

« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2005, 03:11:19 PM »

Your biggest help is going to be the sticky threads at the Fanfilms board at TFN, along with Google and lots of practice with basic cinematography.

For your greenscreen:  Light it brightly and evenly, and stand well away.

Nobody can tell you how to make a good movie, and odds are if this is your first film, it's going to be very, very far from good.  It's just how it is.
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FCRabbath

« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2005, 03:17:17 PM »

Quote
if this is your first film, it's going to be very, very far from good.  It's just how it is.
You are so right.  
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Tru_Slice



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« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2005, 02:21:18 PM »

Ok.

I can tell that you guys are tired of noobs, so spare me the sarcastic comments.

I'll get my help elsewhere.
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TechKrill



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« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2005, 02:49:51 PM »

He's not being sarcastic, and you'll get worse from TFN. I was expecting Funk to say "Learn to use a camera then come back" but he DID give you good advice. Calm down, and don't take it so harshly.

He's making a point...your first film is NOT going to be that great, so to expound on it, maybe you should hold off on the large-scale production and try some smaller things first. Tests are always good, get the feel of a greenscreen, how it works, get the feel of rotoscoping a lightsaber, and get familiar with the basics of cinematography.

A good resource for a lot of good ways to do things is the Trailer Contest that's being voted on right now. http://thebrbforums.com/index.php?showtopic=1274&st=0 Check them out, some are quite good. Take ideas from them, ask questions, be inquisitive.

We're not here to chase away n00bs, FCRabbath and Funk are just telling it like it is, nobody makes a great film on their first try.
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Mrdodobird

« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2005, 02:53:38 PM »

Nobody's being sarcastic.

You just asked a very... akward question...

Quote
please tell me how to make a good movie.

There are approximately a billion zillion answers to that question, give or take. There are hundreds or tips that could be given on an almost infinite amount of topics regarding filmaking.

Most of them you figure out yourself, almost instantaneously, while actually filming. It's an awesome learning curve, indeed, every single time I film something I can walk away from it and be able to list 5 things that would help me in the future... even after all these hundreds of film projects spanning over a decade.

Because of this, it has been said that your first movie wont be very good. Now, there are exceptions. If you're smart, and clever, and have a great mind, I'm sure you COULD make a very good movie.

However, if you ask, "How do I make a good movie", and are upset at the inevitable answers...

If you have a specific question, we'd LOVE to answer it, as many as you have!

but we just can't answer, "How do you make a good movie", except with the following...

"Make a bad movie, but do it opposite."

We're not tired of noobs, we're just tired of that question.

EDIT: Beat me, Tech Wink
« Last Edit: December 21, 2005, 02:58:47 PM by Mrdodobird » Logged
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TechKrill



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« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2005, 04:01:09 PM »

Yea, Techie's quick Smiley *jumps from side to side*
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Tru_Slice



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« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2005, 04:03:47 PM »

Alright then.

Here's a good question:

I have access to a plethora of editing programs. I know that abobe Photoshop and After Effects are the best ones out there, and I can get them.

Which is better to use; After Effects of Photoshop?



I have used Photoshop, and various other clones of the program (like Jasc Paintshop). I am quite familiar with using them.

However, I have never used After Effects. I hear that it is better at editing movies than Photoshop, but since I've never used it, should I stick to Photoshop?

Or should I risk it and try something new and better?

Keep in mind that I do not have or own any of these programs, but that I do have
access to them.
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TechKrill



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« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2005, 04:29:04 PM »

Keep this in mind: Photoshop is 99% about STILL pictures. AfterEffects is akin to Photoshop for movies. It's a BIT more involved then that, and you end up using both programs on films, etc.

But there's really no comparison...there's just too much you can do with AfterEffects that Photoshop is physically incapable of doing. So for movies, AfterEffects is invaluable. Photoshop won't get you very far in motion picture work by itself.

And I'd recommend reading the manuals on both programs since you've never used them before. It will answer almost all your questions before you have to ask them here Smiley THAT gets irritating, when the answers are right there in front of you. Tongue

But naturally, if it's NOT in the manual, or it's vague, we're here to help.
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djr33

« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2005, 05:32:38 PM »

Greenscreening--- you need practice and the right stuff. First, you need an application that will allow you to take out the greenscreen.... for example, After Effects. Premiere also has an option to do so, but its not very good. FCP (if you're using a mac) is another good choice. Third  party plugins will give you better results as well.
Then you ened a screen. There are many ways to get one, or shohuld I say make. You can buy the pain that costs thousands a gallon that's "true chroma green" or just get some at your local hardware store that's close. You can use fabric, posterboard, whatever. Just make something GREEN! (Or blue... but green seems more popular.)
Then the key is lighting it. You need good lighting so its an even color or you'll get chunky keys (as in the noun of "the result when something has been keyed" where keyed is the past tense of the verb for "take green (or blue) out")

As for sabers... www.ryan-w.com has great tutorials. Google it. Practice. Its not hard, but a bit confusing for someone new to it.

For filming... just GO WATCH MOVIES! Its not that hard. Get used to the settings of your camera, like MANUAL focus, exposure, white balance, yada yada yada. Get good at capturing good audio (see our tutorial on that... its at http://thebrb.com/stockpile/tutorials ) and maybe get a good mic to do so.
Then just practice. Get a TRIPOD!


note: I'm running out the door, so listen to what the other guys said too... they know it as well as I do... I just didn't have time to read what they said Smiley Will do soon.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2005, 05:33:33 PM by djr33 » Logged
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FCRabbath

« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2005, 01:13:23 AM »

btw, WELCOME to the forums. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2005, 01:14:26 AM by FCRabbath » Logged
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djr33

« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2005, 04:01:31 AM »

if this is your first film, it's going to be very, very far from good. It's just how it is.

This isn't an insult. Our first works are bad. Its like painting. If you took a paintbrush right now and tried to paint something, do you seriously think it would be good? Probly not. If you did that about 100 times.. i'm guessing it wouldn't be half bad.

A HUGE problem that new filmmakers have is that they want to create a grand star wars fanfilm and haven't worked on enough other projects, so they end up failing. I did it... twice. It's a great goal... but take your time and practice all the stuff. Its not impossible... I'd probably have a fair chance at doing a "grand star wars fanfilm" right now, and that's because I have about 10 projects behind me now and I've gotten a lot better.

We're not trying to make fun of you or anything. Ask a question, we'll answer... we just can't give you the one thing that you really need---- practice! (We all needed, and still need, it)
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Tru_Slice



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« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2005, 08:14:22 AM »

Quote
Its like painting. If you took a paintbrush right now and tried to paint something, do you seriously think it would be good? Probly not. If you did that about 100 times.. i'm guessing it wouldn't be half bad.
Funny you should say that...I am a painter!




I have seen may, many tutorials on rotoscoping already (including Ryan-W.com), and have made various attempts do rotoscoping, so if you'd talk on the next level, I would understand it.

But I have never done greenscreening before, and this is largely unfamiliar to me, even though I have read up on it.

But I do know that greenscreens can be quite expensive, and I am looking for a cheaper, more creative way to create one.

What would you guys reccomend?
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Funk, E

« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2005, 08:21:00 AM »

I like bright green posterboard.  

Ideally, though, you'd get a pure-green paint from a hardware store with a computerized pigmenting system, and then paint a wall or a big thing of particleboard or something along those lines.

But really:  Focus more on basic cinematography first, special effects second.  Lighting is something you should learn about.
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Tru_Slice



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« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2005, 08:26:54 AM »

Posterboard, eh?

(I'm not Canadian)



The green paint is a no-brainer, but I was thinking plywood or something, because I have access to large supplies of it.

Would posterboard be cheaper or better?
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